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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
of those i was the general manager in boston at there and i am aware of the operating practices there, and it's beston and pick the government center and the green line -- several lines go into the green line and trains frequently switched there. that is just one example. we also reached out after we saw the initial report that said that others did not do switchbacks. we reached out to other transit systems that we listed in our response that owls do switchbacks so again the same caveat. all of the other transit systems will tell you would they prefer not to do switchbacks? yes they would. in some cases, in the case of bart they have tracks and they can do other things but they also do switch backs and schedule them everyday as well, so in our view and base some of our personal experiences and discussions with others, other systems do use switch backs. >> okay. maybe i will ask the grand jury this as well, but from your point of view were these not jurisdictions communicating to them during the course of their investigation? >> i did not see that until the finding so we were brief
-road. way off-road. this is a boston duck. it's a truck that's not afraid to get wet. >> this is, i believe, our 12th season on the boston duck tours. >> we took a special ride on the boston duck tour. it's a way to see the city from land and water in the same vehicle. the ducks were around long before this tour began. they go all the way back to world war ii. and what is a boston duck? >> a boston duck is basically a world war ii amphibious landing craft that has been converted into a touring vehicle. so we take people around the city of boston on land and then also into the charles river. these vehicles were used for a lot of different things during world war ii. and mainly they were used as a supply vehicle because they could take supplies from ships onto the mainland. >> the amphibious trucks became known as "dukws." originally designed by general motors, the duck was 31 feet long and 8 feet wide. that's over three times the size of your average s.u.v. it weighed 6½ tons, even though it had no armor. it traveled 50 miles per hour on land and 6 miles per hour in water. it's a challenge
boston, seattle, new york, oakland and san jose or santa clara mta. they all had higher scores than muni. muni was on the bottom. we included bart. since they said other systems did it we decided to look at the systems in paris france. it took months to identify the right officials and in this case either the head of operations or the systems schedulinger all but one which was new york agreed to an extensive interview by two of us and per the rules we were not identified. nevertheless of the interviews as described in the report were significant. all transit systems it became clear had multiple systems that were similar and had challenges and all needed to deal with complex traffic, scheduling, and terrain problems uniquely their own, and yet as we had known the san francisco controller's survey had shown all had higher reliability and rider seaferz than muni and we determined that all systems use switchbacks they only did so in cases of equipment break down or emergencies except for one. one system which happened to be the santa clara mta does use switch backs and interesting
founding in 2008, she has grown to more than 40 employees and has expanded to boston, chicago, los angeles, new york city, portland, san francisco, and seattle, with several more markets to come. under her leadership, it was named one of the next big things in tech by the wall street journal, the start up to watch by ink magazine. please welcome leah. jamie wong is the co-founder and ceo of viable.com. her vision of a more open world and exchanges through travel is the driving force. her commitment to bringing travel experiences to the world by making it easier to find, create, and book provides a platform for the community. she is a dynamic creative and leader with a passion for bringing ideas to market the change the way people live. finally, jay. in his girl as the chief innovation officer, he is working with the tech community and public to bring the government into the digital age. a partnership announced in 2012 will open the doors of government to our tech community to drive new solutions and businesses. if you have ideas for innovating services for government, please send him a twe
in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
a death in the family. the "boston globe" said they had fireworks ready to go. why did they think they were going to win? they had a fundamentally different view of the elect tort. when the public polls came out they looked at these polls and said these polls have too many democrats. there's no way this president will be able to build up the enthusiasm that way. there are a lot of polls that were pretty close. and this person said that -- they said it was inconceivable. we thought there's no way he's going match his 2008 turnout with minorities and young voters an we really didn't think he would increase it. so what happened overall is, the president did worse with white voters but white voters were the same share of the elect tort. but he did far better with african-americans, latinos an young voters because the romney campaign had sort of was looking -- they changed their data. they done their internal polling based on a smaller number of democrats turning out. they thought things were going well. they had a lot of enthusiasm at their rallies. this is what led them to believe th
or higher taxes set to be implemented. one company in boston says it will cut between 1200 and 1400 jobs and plans to shift their investments and workers overseas to china. and the resignation of cia director david petraeus are raising eyebrows and elsewhere, days before he's supposed to testify on capitol hill. he's admitted to affair discovered by the fbi. and benghazi, that killed four americans, including our ambassador. much more on that. i'm jamie colby, back to cavuto on business here on fox, the most powerful name in news. >> neil: forget about blaming the fat cats, you, washington, fix the fiscal mess or there goes the country. and what happens at the end of the year when all of the issues sort of backup at the same time. i could go on and on and on and they back up like planes going back to laguardia. at the same time, the fact of the matter is, right now, we face this. unless this is fixed and soon and republicans get an idea that you can't touch defense and democrats get off the idea you can't even consider reading in the the reining in the growthen entitlements, senator, lis
of world boston. as we head into the pam assessing the aftermath of the arab spring, allow me to thank todd, president and ceo of the world affairs councils of america, his crack staff, national council chair, laurie murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am a wash in debt. it's time to make good on those obligations to each here on the panel who i'm honored to present. i had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i'm owing you a way overdue invitation to the council downtown. professor is a senior fellow at the saban center at brookings institution, a distinguished former and current adviser to government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and he's a prolific and best-selling author. i'll quote from the top of the website at the university of maryland where he is the professor of peace and development. i have always believed that good scholarship can be relevant and consequential for public policy. it is possible to effect public policy without being an advocate, to be passionate ab
amtrak from boston to d.c. on thanksgiving instead of the day before, you'll save about $300 a ticket, or $1,200 for a family of four. and what about if you're driving? the best tips we've heard is to fill up at your destination, if prices are cheaper there. and to fill up well before the peak travel days, because the lines will be much shorter. whatever your mode of transportation, the way to save is to make a plan now and act on it. as one expert said, this is not a great year for procrastination. >> thank you so much, dan. dan harris reporting on "real money" tonight. >>> and coming up, a man who traveled 826 miles to help the victims of hurricane sandy, and the surprising way fate gave him a very big reward. ♪ for medicare open enrollment. [ male anne are you ready? time to compare plans and see what's new. you don't have to make changes, but it's good to look. maybe you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare.
american cities. some to note in front of us are boston, san antonio, los angeles, and new york. new york has the lowest ratio with 4 72 cars for a thousand residents. and again, san francisco is at 6 58. it will be interesting to see how this number declines as we invest in municipal transit and how we plan with the new subway systems coming in. i'd love to take the commission on a walking tour. but with only a few minutes of general public comment, i was going to talk to you guys through a tour of the north side of o'farrell street and o'farrell street is about 24 blocks long. and it starts at grant avenue. i'm going to take the first one grant avenue and call it zero o'farrell street and there we host imporio armani. another high retail store, macy's buildings, block to block, one is entirely macy's. across the street is the central t-line going in there, that's the union square market street stop. and then in the second macy's store there is tommy hilfiger, [speaker not understood] beauty, bakery, pink berry, beauty lapped. -- land. we hit the thai noodle house, [speaker not understoo
entrepreneurial sales at the boston school of management. she's also the author of the book "lucky by design, navigating your path to success." and angela sims, great to see you as well. you have a retail store as well so you deal with this as well. >> we have a boutique in the west willage because our business is so local what we want to do is surprise and delight our passersby. we want to do that with emotion. for example, on mother's day, we asked our customers to send in a photo of their mothers. we want people to walk by and be grabbed by that emotion. >> we were talking about expense earlier -- >> that's not very expensive. it is time, though, you do have to roll up your sleeves. >> harry, you're an expert with this. you worked with small brands. you worked with big stores. for somebody who is not an expert, how can they make an eye-popping window. >> i think in the piece, she talked about the basics of visual, whether they're in a big saks fifth avenue or a small store. doesn't matter. the bakes are there. it's focusing on placement, great lighting. something like having a tag hanging
.a. and boston and we talk about what we're working on and san francisco is one of the leaders they look up to and how to do it and we are doing things on a national scale people are taking notice of and doing that and i heard a lot of talk, and i come from the private sector so when i first got here one of the questions i got "how is government different from the private sector" from the it standpoint. it's night and day. you have hard time drawing parallels and from the private sector come to government thinking that a lot of our ideas and methods of success in the private sector are directly applicable to how we do work in government, and it's a different problem to solve frankly. it's something i have to relearn frequently that the large company i came from was a large monolithic corporation and 1ceo and pyramid up and trickled and everyone did what they did. government as you know we're are a highly decentralized independently elected, independently operated with our boards and commissions. as much as i would like to say i had the authority or will or desire to cast my will on the
would gladly accept. unbelievable. we've got notre dame, boston college at 5:00 p.m. followed by another issue of "lexus after the game." i'm larry beil. >> coming up next, "abc 7 news" follows up on the evacuation of a peninsula hotel. you will hear from a doctor whose miracle diag >> terry: big story out of washington will directly impact the bank accounts of every american. they are locked in a high stakes duel to prevent taxmageddon. here is the latest from the white house. >> thanks everybody. >> if you listen to the president. >> not every detail of the plan. i'm open to compromise. >> and the speaker of the house. >> everything. everything on the revenue side and on the spending side has to be looked at. >> it sounds like a deal to avoid that fiscal cliff of tax hikes, $3700 for the average family and massive spending cuts all possibly sending us back into recession. it sounded like a deal is possible. >> i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. >> that means more tax money, raising tax rates will slow down our ability to create the jobs that everyone says they want. >
killed in an gauzy by ignoring sharia law. joining me now, andrew boston, the author of the new book, sharia versus freedom, the legacy of islamic totalitarianism. it is great to have you with us. we appreciate it. let's start with, first, the idea that sharia law, a lot of people this message saying it is a cultural aspect of the islamic life that poses no threat to america. your thoughts. >> sharia is really foundational in islamic societies. it is derived from the text of islam, the traditions of mohammad demanded has many ritual aspects that might be similar to other religions demand but it is also an entire political system. and here is where it runs afoul of modern human rights concepts like our bill of rights, the universal declaration of human rights. it includes a timeless war doctrine. it also rejects basic human freedoms like freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and it imposes discriminatory regulation, legal regulations against non muslim minorities and women. also includes dehumanizing punishments are well we would consider dehumanizing punishments like flashing for
notre dame, boston college and college football at 5:00 p.m. on abc7 followed by another edition of lexus after the game at 8:30. hope to see you then. have great weekend. i'm larry beil. >> coming up next, abc7 news follows up on the evacuation of a peninsula hotel. you will hear from the doctor whose miracle diagnosis triggered it. >> topping our news this half-hour, the election is behind them but the debate between republicans and democrats on taxes is just getting started. president obama meets with congressional leaders next week to decide which americans should get tax cuts and which, if any, should be taxed more. in his weekly address the president says the election showed support for a balanced approach, one that extends tax cuts for the middle class burks , but he won't accept a plan that doesn't ask the wealthiest americans to pay more. republican response from house speaker john boehner said proposed tax hikes on small business owners would cost america hundreds of jobs. >> can't just cut our way to prosperity. if we are serious about reducing the deficit, we have to
. >> laura: in the last three days. everyone from boeing, to cat pillar, lock keyed harr continue, boston scientific, these are thousands of jobs if you add them all up. >> yeah. >> laura: what's going on here. a lot of them citing obama care because of the implementing cost of that. >> nothing related to the election of the president should be a reason why anybody is going through layoffs. it's not like it was a surprise that the president could have won re-election on tuesday. that should have been something that people maybe put a part of their first alert forecast for a long time. and anybody who needs to lay off workers right now, they had systemic problems long before tuesday. >> laura: businesses aren't making legitimate business decisions exside technology, bristol myers. >> they might be legitimate business decisions but it's not because of the results of the election. come on. >> laura: some of them are actually saying it's the result of the election. >> they may be saying it to absolve them of their own i how the business has or has not grown, really come on. >> laura: you thin
two of these political reporters with me tonight. matt viser from "the boston globe" and ashley parker of the "new york times." ashley, thank you so much. you were right in there. give me the tick tock. tell me the mood tuesday night because it seemed to me there was some amazing time before -- between when we called it here at nbc around 11:00, a little after 11:00, 11:20, and when the after 11:00 and when the loser came out and talked, romney. >> it went from extreme confidence to extreme shell shocked at the very end when he came out to speak. in between, there was this weerld moment of what's going to happen. all the aids have been told to show up with packed bags ready to go in case there was a recount. there was a call that said there was going to be a recount in virginia or ohio. bring your bags outside of the garden. we're taking them to the airport and you'll be on the first flights out to virginia and ohio. and obviously, that was called off. >> then there was a point where the presidential candidate himself governor romney came outside and said it's gone? >> i mean, so he wa
to play the role of leader of the republican party. the boston globe reported that mr. romney is likely to move to la jolla, california, to spend more time with his car, presumably. but in his short time as leader of the republican party, when he was their presidential nominee, he made leadership decisions about the party. about what the party's like. about what the party looks like to the rest of the country. he made leadership decisions particularly in terms of who he would dignify with his embrace. who among everybody in the republican party, he, mitt romney, leader of the party, would privilege. who he would elevate. he elevated guys like chris cobach. the republican guy who wrote arizona's papers please immigration law. he was mitt romney's immigration adviser. he made and then kept as his national campaign chairman a man named john sununu who called president obama lazy and not very bright and said president obama needs to, quote, learn how to be an american. mitt romney's national campaign chairman. mr. romney also elevated and dignified by his presence, i'm sorry to have to say
happened at all. don't forget, we are have notre dame, boston college and college football at 5:00 p.m. on abc7 followed by another edition of lexus after the game at 8:30. hope to see you then. have great weekend. i'm larry beil. >> coming up next, abc7 news follows up on the evacuation of a peninsula hotel. you will hear from the doctor whose miracle diagnosis triggered it. >> i'm nannette miranda in sacramento. november is carbon monoxide awareness month but many californians don't have an alarm in ♪ just put a little bit of yourself ♪ ♪ in everything you do [ female announcer ] add your own ingredients to hamburger helper for a fresh take on a quick, delicious meal. it's one box with hundreds of possibilities. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> topping our news this half-hour, the election is behind them but the debate between republicans and democrats on taxes is just getting start
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
in the edwards school in boston, i use these examples because there are examples where we see things work, then let's use it to engage kids. we know if kids are engaged in music, they don't drop out. we know if you actually figure out what will spark an interest in kids whether it's robot particulars, for me it was civics because i was a social studies teacher, arts, physical education, sports, if you spark an interest in an add less sent, they'll stay. >> i'll go a step further. it seems like there was a time, randi, where parents were at fault. the schools are doing what they can, now it's parents, parents, parents. now it's teachers. they're insufficient, inadequate. we can't have them making living wages or any of those kinds of things. >> right. really, really important but we're going to bash them and we don't want to hear their voice. >> it feels like not only do you need these kinds of things to keep students engaged, but teachers in order to feel excited and make a difference, you can't have 50 kids in a classroom and be teaching to a standardized test and feel at all points like
have a sense of place. so we're talking from new orleans to new delhi, from bangkok to boston, across the world we're looking for those places that you kind of want to keep to yourself but you know you have to share. >> and we're not talking just the five stars, the white linen restaurants. we're talking your food trucks, your greasy spoons, all of them? >> i'm thinking brasseries but also food trucks, as you said, street food stalls, kabob stands, anything that you love. when you think about what is that one meal that i want to have in that destination that really signifies the place, that's what we're talking about. we want people to feel that hometown pride, whether it's a place they live or travel to and they know the secret spot so we can get everybody out of their hotel rooms so they're not having necessarily a cold room service burger and they're experiencing the place. because after all when you're in a restaurant that really is a local place, that's when you're really going to have a sense of place and really feel like you're experiencing that destination. >> absolutely. i un
near boston was fine, mama couldn't understand why they were calling. later that night when uncle louie finally got through, they gained some sense of the damage. he had had to leave his house and fight his way to the telephone office to get a line. all along main street big, old elms had fallen. the virgin pine forest in paradise was wrecked. that was an area of kind of unspoiled trees behind the house in windsor. it's now a beautiful park, but it no longer has these immense firs and pines that were there in the '30s. the virgin pine forest in paradise was wrecked. the woods, mama would say later, looked as if giants had been playing jack straws. everywhere ruined and paradise never again the same. that had been rob's personal family loss. it would be nearly two years more before all hell broke loose around the globe. so this is a digression. now we have to go back to egypt in 1942, but what was interesting in a way was what was about to happen to rob at this point was all hell was about to break loose for him. he would be moved to the front lines. he'd learned how to operate a wonderf
on the appeals court in boston. he is from portland and have been backed by both republican senators. he was part of what they call thurmond's rule. >> thurmond-leahy rule. >> angus king, from maine, claiming the party alignment is up for grabs. his initial request is he would align with whatever party agreed to push for essentially doing away with the current filibuster rules. harry reid made clear he is not willing to go that far. i know still think angus king will align with a democrat. he endorsed obama. >> and he said yesterday he had conversations with him in the past 24 hours. >> and a phone call with bob corker. the point being that this is the kind of thing that i think a lot of freshmen -- king most vocal among them, they will come to the senate and say let us not spend our first months of this silliness of gratuitous filibuster and blocking a holding everything. let's clear out the underbrush. like you are speaking about, who none of us ever heard of. these are assistant secretaries that one or two senators even care about. >> i think a wrinkle is depending on how much it gets done in
'll be appearing at m.i.t. in boston where i'll be talking about my book and the election. today's show was only a preview. go to our facebook page. >>> i want to finish today's program with a final thought on the election. on tuesday night after the race had been called, the first call i made was to my brother, luke. when i got married in july of 2007 luke had to take a few days off his new job as an obama field day campaign organizer in nevada to take part in the election. that was five years. in the intervening months my brother has spent every single day working for the obama campaign. he's worked in eight states, at times literally living out of clothes in trash bags while putting 87,000 miles on a beat up old white ford pickup truck. 60 to 90 hours a week 52 weeks a year for five years. then from his perch as a nevada state director this time around to get him re-elected. i'm biased, of course, but to me tuesday's victory was luke's victory as much as it was anyone else's. luke and the thousands like him, organizers of every hue and background and creed in states across the nation working
of the continental army goes up to boston, sees that there are black men with guns and knows he is not going to be able to sell this to his brethren in south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually changes his mind when he needed more bodies in his army. we always have to weigh these things. they are not simple black-and-white issues. yes he was a man of his times, he was a man who was part of a society that was utterly dependent upon slavery and he knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration, but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that "don't know much about literature: what you need to know but never learned about great books and authors" >> host: kenneth davis is our guest. every offer we have on in depth we ask some questions of them and we are going to show use those now. we have an hour-and-a-half left in our program and we will be right back with your phone calls. >> host: we are live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city, this is booktv o
la accion deportiva nos llega en directo desde nuestra estacion afiliada, univision boston... alli se encuentra oscar burgos con toda la informacion... oscar adelante... mls: playoffs iniciamos con la mls porque ya se conocen a los finalistas de las conferencias, anoche en nueva york por el este, dc united de visita supero 1-0 a red bulls, el unico gol fue anotado por el la pausa y al volver... fanny gutierrez, nos presentara a un talento local con su nueva produccion discografica, entros temas en colombia,las autoridades ofra recompensa de 27 mil dolares a quienes ofrezcan informacion que permita ubicar a los autores intelectuales y materiales de una matanza en el noroeste del pais en la que fueron masacrados 10- campesinos... segun las autoridades, tres personas entraron a una finca y, tras someter a los trabajadores hicieron estallar una granada de mano y luego abrieron fuego contra las victimas.... la masacre revivio el terror paramilitar en el norte del pais... en colombia, en costa rica, lo que comenzo como una manifestacion pacifica en defensa de la caja del seguro social, ter
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)